Book: Suddenly in Charge

suddenly_in_charge“Suddenly in Charge: Managing Up, Manage Down, Succeeding All Around” By Roberta Chinsky Matuson
  •  “Get as much detailed information as possible about your boss’s goals, strengths, weaknesses, and preferred working style and about the pressures on your boss.”
  • “Make an honest self-appraisal about your own needs, objectives, strengths, weaknesses, and personal style.”
  • “Armed with this information, create a relationship that fits both parties’ key needs and styles, and one in which both you can your boss understand what is expected of you.”
  • “Maintain the relationship by keeping the boss informed, behaving dependably and honestly, and using hte boss’s time and other resources selectively.”
  • “Don’t assume anything. Don’t assume that what you are thinking is an appropriate way of communicating with a new boss and that this approach is going to match his needs and style.”
  • “Ask your boss how he prefers to receive communications from you.”
  • “Is your boss so busy that she has little time for the details and barely has time for the facts? If so, it’s your responsibility to adjust your communication style by providing her with a summary of the findings and recommendations of your project, rather than providing all the details.”
  • “You have to test whatever you are going to recommend. What I mean by this is that you must test your conclusions with the people who are going to be using the results of your work.” “This approach demonstrates that you’ve done your due diligence and your work is credible.”
  • “Tell people what they need to know. Keep asking yourself, so what? Does this person really need to know this? If not, move on.”
  • The dictatorial manager: “Common traits of managers who embrace this style are that he is the only one who knows what is going on; is always right; isn’t interested in hearing other people’s views; discourages dissent; may allow some discussion, then ignores what is said; closely monitors every task; doe snot allow others to questions decisions or authority; can ofen be heard yelling at subordinates; and motivates through fear.”
  • “Survival in this situation requires that you depersonalize the matter.”
  • “Pick your battles–If yo know you’ve got a boss who enjoys going to battle with his charges, the give him very little ammunition. If his order isn’t a matter of life and death, then do what he asks.”
  • “Anticipate your boss’s needs–Dictatorial bosses love to catch people making mistakes. You can avoid falling into this trip by being prepared at all times.”
  • “Do your job well–It’s difficult to excel when you are working under these conditions, but that is exactly what you must do.”
  • “Establish credibility–It’s going to take a longer period of time to build trust with a manager who falls into this category, but that doesn’t mean it is impossible to do so. Give her exactly what she needs, when she needs it, and eventually she will cut back on the micromanaging.”
  • “Traits commonly associated with hands-off managers are: Limited communication; an expectation that the people in their domain are capable of managing themselves; and a belief that their direct reports can handle their own problems with little guidance or intervention. These managers also believe in high accountability. They feel that if they giving you this level of trust, you had best deliver.”
  • “Be respectful of her time–These type of managers are typically bottom-line people.” “Therefore, it is important to keep your conversation brief.”
  • “Ask questions–With this type of boss, you are going to have to ask lots of questions, since laissez-faire bosses are either too busy to give you direction or really don’t know enough about what you are supposed to be doing to provide adequate guidance.”
  • “Keep her informed–Yes, I did just say that when it comes to conversations, this type of manager believes less is more. However, no one likes surprises, not even a manager who is hands off. This means that onus is on you to come to her with questions, problem, and suggestions.”
  • “Be prepared to manage your own performance–If you want a good evaluation (or any evaluation, for that matter), you are going to have to take control of your performance review. A hands-off manager can’t possibly be aware of all the contributions you have made. That’s why it is your responsibility to remind her of what you’ve accomplished.”
  • The bureaucratic boss: “These are the bosses who do everything by the rules, even if the rules don’t make sense anymore.”
  • “Learn the rules–The best way to handle a bureaucratic boss is to learn the rules and regulations of the organization.”
  • “Follow protocol–when you approach your boss about doing something, you need to show him that you’ve gone through the proper channels prior to coming to him for final approval.”
  • “Be patient–Realize that change is slow to take hold on organizations built on the foundations of bureaucracy.”
  • The consultative leader: “If you could choose the type of boss you would have, this would be the one to select. When it comes to decision making, these types of leaders involve others in problem solving and weigh the options, even through they reserve the veto power. Most have strong listening skills and are good at building relationships with their people and with others in the organization. They also recognize others for their contributions.”
  • “Be prepared–You will be asked your opinion. Therefore, it’s important that you think about how you will respond to certain questions the boss is likely to ask.”
  • “Be an idea maker–Consultative bosses enjoy giving people credit for their ideas. They empower their people and delight in the successes that result. They appreciate those who come to the table with innovative ideas”
  • “Don’t take things personally–It’s easy to forget that this type of boss is not running a democracy. Anticipate that there will be times when your boss will pull rank. Support her decision and move on.”
  • “Communicate your gratitude–You are fortunate to have a boss like this. Every now and again, let your boss know how much you appreciate his willingness to treat you more like a peer than a subordinate.”
  • How not to manage your relationship with your boss:
    • “Fail to follow through”
    • “Go over the boss’s head” “With the exception of situations that are illegal, it is best to try to work things out with your boss before escalating the situation.”
    • “Be disrespectful to your boss”
    • “Lie to the boss”
    • “Throw your boss over the cliff–Your job is to support your boss. It is not to let his superiors know how inept your boss is. If you’re asked about your boss’s performance, you certainly don’t need to lie. But you also don’t need to bring out a ten-page list of all the inadequacies you’ve noticed since the day you started working for this person.”
  • “Pfeffer defines power as the ability to get things done through people.”
  • “Here you have two choices; you can be a victim and complain at the injustice or you can realize that life happens for you, not to you. I chose the latter; I sat down and said to myself that apparently I had miscalculated. Perception can be reality and I have to ‘sell’ just as hard inside my organization as I do outside of my organization.”
  • “Call it politics, call it sales, call it unfair, the moral of the story is you can be the best at your job but if you aren’t seen in the right light by the right people it won’t really matter.”
  • “The first is position power, which is often referred to as hierarchical power. This is the formal authority someone has over others based solely on her position; this may include control of budgets and physical facilities, as well as control over information.”
  • “The other type of power is personal power. This is the ability of the individual to influence others. The amount of personal power is directly related to the amount of trust one has established with colleagues.”
  • “Know the other players–It doesn’t take long for most people to figure out the payers in the workplace who will advocate on their behalf and the ones who won’t. The grapevine can provide you with information regarding people who like to see others succeed and those who would drive right over you if given the key to a John Deere Tractor.”
  • “Think before moving–I’m not saying that you should analyze every single move you make. However, I am suggesting that you think your moves through carefully and anticipate what might happen next, particularly when your move will affect others or when you are in a highly visible situation.”
  • “Play quietly–Sometimes the best way to avoid a no-win situation is to play quietly. You do this by moving around the organization, making as little fanfare as possible. You operate under the radar screen.”
  • “Develop strong relationships with people other than your boss, preferably with individuals who are highly influential in the organization. One of the best ways to do this is to volunteer to work on a task force that includes people from other parts of the company.”
  • “Steer clear of gossip”
  • Don’t believe everything you hear: “Before you go further, ask yourself the following: Is the person who is telling me this someone who is reliable, or is he known as a gossip? How likely is that this scenario is true? Will I damage the relationship with this person if I go to her without evidence? What will my boss think of me if I go running into hsi office ranting, based on a rumor?”
  • “Ignore the rumors, unless you have a solid evidence that a friend has now become a foe.”
  • Ways politics play out:
    • “The allocation of resources–Resources are tightly held, particularly in challenging times. Yet it’s difficult, and may feel impossible, to do your job effectively without resources. Think about your ability to complete business and personal objectives with fewer people, less money, and little support from those above and around you. “
    • “Administrative succession–You may have observed that some people seem to climb the corporate ladder rapidly. Most likely, these are the people who get things done in the organization, which makes them more valuable.”
    • “The design of an organization si often referred to as the structure. In larger or more formal organizations, organizational charts are often used to depict the structure.” “Those closer to the person holding the most power (the CEO, president or owner) have access to better information. They also have more formal authority and nicer offices!”
  • Common myths
    • “Bosses love employees who always say yes. Well, no, that’s not quite accurate. People who say yes all the time don’t add much value.” “The majority of bosses I know prefer to surround themselves with people who can think for themselves and have the courage to speak their mind.”
    • “‘Yes’ people are promoted more rapidly” “When it comes to company promotions, people who can think on their feet and make difficult decisions then to win out over those who say ‘yes’ just so they can fit in.”
    • “Everyone likes people who go with the flow.” “Life is too short to go with the flow. Stop the flow or go against the flow, if need be. This approach will serve you well in business because businesses want to move their organizations forward. None are satisfied with the status quo. If you aren’t pushing back, trying new things, and failing, then you aren’t moving forward.”
  • Difficulties to push back
    • Fear: “The next time someone says something that you don’t agree with, take a stand. Make yourself do this each time it is needed, and over time you will find that it feels natural to do so.”
    • Low self-esteem: “Instead of saying, ‘If I tell her I think she is wrong, she will fire me,’ say, ‘I’d be remiss if I didn’t tell her that she is about to drive off a cliff.'”
    • Peer pressure: “However, at the end of the day, you need to be able to look yourself in the mirror and like what you see.”
  • How to say no
    • When don’t have time or capacity: “A better response would be to say, ‘I need your help prioritizing my projects.” Then be prepared to lay out what’s currently on your plate, along with an estimate as to how long it’s going to take to complete these items and what you may have to put aside in your to honor his new request.”
    • When you disagree with the approach: “With your permission, I’d like to suggest another idea.” If the answer is no, “You can do what you’ve been asked to do. Alternately, if doing so would put people in harm’s way, you can say, ‘I’m very concerned about this,’ and then tell her why.”
    • When you believe your boss is about to make a costly mistake: “A better way to get his attention without setting off all the alarms would be to say, ‘You know, I’ve been reviewing the numbers on this equipment we are about to buy, and I am wondering if we may hae overlooked something. Can we talk about this before proceeding?” “If he decided to proceed without hearing your concerns, then be sure to note in your calendar that you tried to warn him, just in case the situation comes back to bite him–and possibly you as well.”
    • When there is a valid reason: “Your boss looks around the room and assigns you the task of going to Staples to pick up more ink.” “If you truly belive that stopping to do this task will have a negative impact on the outcome of your project, consider responding with ‘Perhaps someone else can run over to Stables, so I can use this time to incorporate the last-minute changes to our client pitch that we’ve all agreed to include.”
  • Time to back down
    • “Your boss seems annoyed.”
    • “Your boss refuses to discuss the topic anymore.”
    • “Your boss’s blood pressure is rising (and so is yours).”
    • “You discover you’ve taken the wrong stand.”
    • “A final decision has been made.”
  • “It’s never a good idea to embarrass your boss. Always scan your environment before advancing and going head-to-head with your boss; be sure that what you are about to say is appropriate given who else is within hearing distance.”
  • “Nothing is so important that you can’t wait until you can get to a place that offers privacy before taking your stand.”
  • “Your may be perfectly correct in what you are about to say to your boss. However, if your tone is inappropriate, none of this will matter.”
  • “For example, does he like frequent communication or does he prefer to receive weekly updates? Does he want to know all the background information or only your final recommendations?”
  • “managing a younger boss is more about managing one’s attitude.”
  • “The best way to get others to recognize your contribution is to consistently do good work.”
  • “In private, tell the offender you are more apt to hear what he is saying if he speaks to you, rather than yells at you. Then be prepared to walk aways the next time he reams you out in front of others, as this is one habit that is hard to break.”
  • “If you can manage to keep your head down and do your job (in spite of what is going on around you), you may be able to survive this boss until you either find a new job or your boss is promoted or terminated.”
  • “Sometimes the best action is inaction. I have found that when employees refuse to acknowledge bullying bosses, those bosses turn their attention to others.”
  • “There is nothing wrong with prayer and meditation to get you through these types of situations.”
  • “praise in public and give feedback/constructive criticism in private!”
  • “Allowing your direct reports to be heard and recognized is one of the most effective ways to toot your own horn as a manager.”
  • Bragging mistakes
    • “Bad timing–Don’t brag about the new oversea assignment you’ve received when your colleague has been transferred to the least desirable location imaginable.”
    • “Insensitivity to priorities–Wait to brag to your boss until she is relaxed and you have her full attention.”
    • “Too many potatoes and not enough meat–Don’t tell the boss about everything you do; reserve your bragging for the juicy stuff.”
  • Ways to make certain your work is noticed
    • “Storytelling–Everyone loves a story, particularly a good story.”
    • “Deliver with confidence” “Keep practicing until your delivery matches the excellences of your story.”
    • “Create a master list of boastful moments” “That’s why I recommend keeping a list on your computer. This way you can easily retrieve stories when you need them.”
    • “Lead, don’t just follow” “Identify one organization and make a commitment to do more than show up for the monthly meetings.”
    • “Volunteer for highly visible projects within your own organization”
    • “Keep your boss updated on your accomplishments”
  • “Common bragging is something only obnoxious, self-centered people do.” “Unlike the common brag, Strategic Bragging is the art of telling your success stories so that people say, ‘Tell me more.’ No one wants to hear, ‘Yay me. I am great. Look at me!” But everyone wants to hear a good story with a happy ending. It’s all in how you weave your tale. An interesting brag story begins with a bit of scene setting, just like the movies. Do this in only a sentence or two. Then explain what problem you solved, how you solved it, and the results you got. The key is to listen to other people first, and when they ask about you, say, ‘For example,’ and tell your story.”
  • “People who believe they can succeed see opportunities where other see threats,” notes Goldsmith. “They’re not afraid of uncertainty or ambiguity. They embrace it. Given the choice, they will always be on themselves.”
  • “Effective leaders gather the facts, examine the alternatives, and choose the best course possible, given what they know–and they do it quickly.”
  • “Wearing nicer clothes may raise your confidence level.”
  • “When you are dressed well, you signal to others that you are successful and are really confident in whatever you’re doing.”
  • “Dressing nicely affects how others perceive you.”
  • “The leaders I know with executive presence make you feel like you are the only person in the room. They wouldn’t dare answer a call when they are in the middle of a conversation with you, nor would they respond to a text.”
  • “Plan on arriving early to meetings and mark your territory with a water bottle and your notebook. When possible, take the seat that’s next to your boss. Of course, it’s also important to mind your manners.”
  • “Good eye contact engages others. When you fail to make regular eye contact, you miss out on a huge opportunity to connect with your audience.”
  • “It’s important to speak with enthusiasm and conviction, especially when selling an idea to your boss.”
  • “Dial up the volume on your voice. Your excitement will be contagious!”
  • “The higher up in the organization you go, the more often you’ll be asked to present. My advice to you is to start working on this now so you’ll feel confident and ready to present at a moment’s notice.”
  • mentors
    • “Are usually much higher up in an organization than you”
    • “May be in a role that you aspire to be in someday”
    • “Hold a position of influence that is determined by the values you place in them”
    • “Are usually not compensated”
    • “May become a lifelong advocate or friend”
  • Coaches
    • “Set a strategy for your development as a leader”
    • “Work with you to develop milestones and hold you accountable as you work toward achieving these mutually agreed-upon objectives”
    • “Help you see blind spots that often prevent managers from achieving success”
    • “Are compensated for their services”
    • “Work with you until it is determined that you have achieved your established objectives”
  • “The boss has other responsibilities, such as accounting, HR, customer service, and so forth. She is looking at the big picture and may not always have time to give yo the kind of guidance you may require, particularly if you are just starting out in management.”
  • “Said believes that the mentoring relationship must be a two-way street. He says, ‘You have to provide some sort of value to the mentor. This maybe a small sign of appreciation, or it may involve trying to help the mentor out as well.'”
  • “Make sur the mentor doesn’t just becomes a sounding board for your problems, but acts as someone who helps you reflect on the situations that arise and makes you think about how to deal with them.”
  • When it’s time to go
    • “You used to be invited to participate in closed-door meetings where highly confidential matters were discussed. Lately, you noticed the blinds are closed in the conference room, yet you are noticing this from the outside of the room.”
    • “Your boss asks you to train a ‘backup'”
    • “Your company is tanking”
    • “Our sales team has been asked to increase sales by more than 25 percent per year. The problem is that our production facility is maxed out, order fulfillment is running way behind, and customers are getting angry and leaving. If your salary or bonus is tied to sales under these circumstances, it is time to leave.”
    • “Your company is merging or being acquired”
    • “Your boss gets fired”
    • “At some point you may realize you have gone as far as you are going to go with your present company.”
  • “Remember to thank, reward, and recognize the contributions of those who helped you succeed so that they remain inspired to give you their all.”
  • Creating creditability
    • “build on the strengths that have helped you achieve this milestone and make a name for yourself based on the skills and values you bring to the position.”
    • “No one expects you to be perfect, but they do expect you to be truthful.”
    • “Keep your commitment to follow up.”
    • “Working alongside your employees Will allow you to experience what it is like to be in their shoes.”
    • “Resist the temptation to offer advice on how they can do this jobs better. Instead, seek input on what it is they need in order to be more successful.”
    • “However, all seem to agree that body language plays a greater role in communication than spoken words. Give a great care to ensure your body language and tone when communicating with others to ensure that the message you intend to send is the message that others are receiving”
  • How to build morale and employee engagement
    • “Maher made it clear to his team that he truly believe that individually and collectively they had the capability to be the beat. Then he acted as if that were true.”
    • “He fought for them and championed them in the division in the company. He had their best interest at heart”
    • “Maher acted in the belief that he was there to make them successful and supported them in every way he could.”
    • “Praising and rewarding his people for their accomplishments.”
    • “He made sure that no one who wanted or needed help was ever left alone with a problem.”
    • “Making it okay to fail”
    • “Make work fun”
  • Cultivating lifelong relationships with employees
    • “Always do as much as you can to effect positive change”
    • “Lead by example”
    • “Hire for fit, train for skill.”
    • “Build on strengths, rather than weakness.”
    • “Make sure everyone knows the goals you are trying to achieve”
    • “Invest your time with your great employees to make them better”
  • Signs of week employee connection to the organization
    • “A reliable employee is now less dependable”
    • “An employee no longer contributes her opinions”
    • “A valuable employee no longer volunteers to take on projects”
    • “A highly energetic team member who always did whatever was necessary to complete his work is now contributing at a minimal level.”
    • “An employee who used to participate in company functions no longer does.”
  • “Sit down with or phone your direct reports on a regular basis and ask, ‘How is it going?’ Then ask, ‘How are you feeling about things in general?'”
  • Why purpose matter
    • Purpose provides clarity on how your work fit into the mission of the organization
    • “Purpose helps you attract the right people to your organization.”
    • “Purpose inspire people to give it their best”
    • “Purpose increases employee satisfaction and productivity”
    • “Purpose increases employee retention”
  • Characteristics of purpose
    • “The core purpose must be easily understood.”
    • People must be able to easily connect with the purpose.”
    • “It must be something to which people are willing to dedicate their energy.”
    • “It must feel meaningful.”
  • Questions to ask when developing purpose
    • “Why does our team or department exist?”
    • “If our team disappeared tomorrow, what would be lost?”
    • “Why would team members dedicate their time, effort, and commitment to our department?”
  • Principles of purposeful leadership
    • “Be true to yourself so you can be true to others”
      • “The people on your team are watching your every move. They can tell when you are not fully invested. It’s hard to fake enthusiasm and passion. Don’t bother trying. It will backfire.”
    • “Tell the truth when no one else will”
    • “Manage from the heart and connect with people’s souls”
    • “Lead with respect”
      • “The golden rule of treating people as you’d like to be treated your-self is important when seeking to establish and maintain relationshipa with those you manage.”
    • “Keep your behavior in line with your intentions”
    • “Provide clear direction so others can follow”
    • “Provide purposeful recognition”
  • Hiring
    • “Meet with anyone who wants to discuss job opportunities with you, whether you have a job opening or not”
    • “Take on a leadership role in your trade association.”
    • “Build your LinkIn network.”
    • “Before beginning the hiring process, clearly defined the role your employee will fill.”
    • “The wider you cast your net, the more likely you will find that perfect match.”
  • “Studies consistently show that employees don’t leave companies. They leave their managers.”
  • “Magnetic leaders don’t try to be someone they are not; nor do they change who they are based on office politics. They are true to themselves and are honest in their dealings with others. They are not afraid to share their mistakes or shortcomings.”
  • “Leaders who are transparent are consistently honest and open in their communication–so much so that people never have to guess what these leaders really mean when they say something.”
  • “a strong leader provides a constant stream of feedback and does so even if the information he is sharing may not be what the other person is expecting.”
  • Questions to answer to write a leaving speech:
    • “What possibilities and dreams do you have for your people?”
    • “How will they be better off having known you?”
    • “What would you like them to say about their experience working for you?”
  • Questions leaders should ask their people on a regular basis:
    • “How are things going?”
    • “What else do you need from me to be successful in your job?”
    • “How likely are you to recommend my work group or our company to others?”
    • “Where would you like to go next in the company, an dhow can I best support you in your endeavor?”
  • Questions to ask if you will able to save the relationship:
    • “Is the other person interested in working on the relationship, or has she thrown in the towel?”
    • “How much will I need to invest in the situation, and will it be worth the return?”
    • “What is the opportunity cost of spending y time on this?”
  • Signs this relationship cannot — or should not — be saved:
    • “Your employee goes to your boss and tells her you are inept. It’s very difficult to rebuild trust with an employee who has just stabbed yo in the back.”
    • “An employee knowingly divulges confidential information to your competitors.”
    • “Your work styles are incompatible. For example, you require work to be completed when it is assigned and the employee pays no attention to deadlines”
  • Creating a workplace where people feel valued
    • “Allow people to finish their sentences before jumping in. When an employee shares a challenging situation with you, don’t assume he wants you to provide hi with an answer. He may merely be processing his thoughts out load. Ask him if he is seeking advice before providing it.”
    • “Be genuine in your communication”
    • “Ask people for their opinions and listen to their ideas. Involve them when appropriate, and be sure to give credit where credit is due.”
    • “Provide feedback”
    • “Respect people’s personal time”
    • “Deliver praise loudly and clearly”
  • Writing Goals and Objectives
    • “Involve the employee in the process: There is nothing worse for an employee than being handed a set of goals and being told this what is expected. This approach provides employees with little control over their own future. Some employees are conflict averse. They may agree to the goals, knowing the standard is impossible to achieve. Others will simply quit. Instead, being with, ‘What do you think you can achieve?’ Go from there and discuss your expectation.”
    • “Goals should be specific and measurable”
    • “Keep goals realistic”
  • Tips on firing
    • “Recognize that this will be an extremely difficult moment for the employee and do your best to e respectful.”
    • “When communicating your final warning to the employee, be direct. Let the employee know that if she is unable to turn her performance around within a specified amount of time, her employment will be terminated.”
    • “Plan what you are going to say and do your best to stick with your script. You don’t know where this situation will wind up and you certainly don’t want to explain to your company’s labor attorney how you told this employee he was one of your stronger players, while simultaneously firing him.”
    • “Focus your discussion on performance-related issues.”
    • “It’s equally important to write up the details of the final conversation while it is still fresh in your mind.”
    • “Keep the conversation brief, Let the employee know why he is bing let go, when his last day will be, and any other information he may need as he leaves the firm. This may include information about unemployment benefits (information you may be required to provide, depending on the state where your company is located); health insurance information, if applicable, and details about any other services, such as outplacement, that he maybe entitled to.”
    • “If possible, offer the employee an opportunity to resign.”
    • “If you are required to lay off more than one person, set aside time to meet individually with each employee in a private office. Give employees ample time to ask questions and to compose themselves before escoreting them from the room.”
    • “Here is how I suggest you respond if poor performance or wrongdoing is the reason for termination: ‘I’m not at liberty to discuss the details with you, but I wanted you to know that as of this afternoon Diane Smith is no longer with the company. I am not going to provide you with any specifics, out of respect for Diane and her right to privacy. If you have specific questions as to how this change will impact your work, then setup a time to see me this week so we can discuss this. So, let’s talk about how we will move forward so that nothing falls through the cracks.”
  • Career advice
    • “Focus on outcomes you’ve achieved while in your current position, instead of tasks.”
    • “Ask your boss what, if anything you could have done differently to have earned the promotion.”
    • “See if he’d be willing to recommend you for a promotion elsewhere in the company or in another division.”
    • “Be one step ahead of your boss”
    • “Be the person who volunteers whenever your manager asks for additional help”
    • “Seek out opportunities to work on projects that impact the bottom line.”
    • “In most companies there are a handful of people who are highly relied upon to solve problems. Become that person.”
    • “I suggest you pick one or two ways to increase your learning and add more as your needs changes and as time permits.”
    • “The people who usually get ahead are those who are willing to push the outer limits.”
    • “Experienced leaders understand that there will be high and lows. They remain calm by trying to foresee situations that may put undue stress on their work group. They get in front of the problems rather than waiting for problems to occur. They also surround themselves with a strong them to help them soldier through whatever may come their way.”
    • “Putting people before personal gains and profits”
    • “Leadership may not have a one-size-fits-all definition, but most acts of leadership do share a common goal: Inspiring change.”
    • “Hands down, the best leaders are those who persevere. Success on any level requires the ability to follow through, to execute a plan, and to stick with it.”
    • “The quickest way to advance your career is to demonstrate competence.”
    • “You have to let go in order to move forward.”
    • “You won’t be able to take on more interesting work if you don’t learn how to delegate.”

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